Passanante Pro Tips: Meat Temps

Meat & Poultry Temperature Guide

I think we can all agree that there’s nothing worse than sitting down to enjoy dinner after a long day only to cut into your meat and realize it isn’t done. Well, maybe there is one thing worse – taking a bite before realizing it’s not done!

While a seasoned chef can usually determine doneness by touch, it’s an uncertain method at best. The only 100% sure-fire way to guarantee you don’t dig into partially raw meat is to check the internal temperature with a meat thermometer.

Our pro tip? Don’t risk illness for the sake of your ego – save your creativity for seasoning and presentation and rely on a thermometer for doneness.

PoultryWhole Bird
165 degrees Fahrenheit
Thighs, Legs & Wings
165 degrees Fahrenheit
Boneless Breasts
165 degrees Fahrenheit
Ground Poultry
165 degrees Fahrenheit


Medium
160 degrees Fahrenheit
Well-Done
170 degrees Fahrenheit
Ground Pork
160 degrees Fahrenheit

Rare
110-115 degrees Fahrenheit
Medium-Rare
145 degrees Fahrenheit
Medium
160 degrees Fahrenheit
Medium-Well
145-150 degrees Fahrenheit
Well-Done
155-160 degrees Fahrenheit
Ground Lamb
170 degrees Fahrenheit

Rare
115 degrees Fahrenheit
Medium-Rare
145 degrees Fahrenheit
Medium
160 degrees Fahrenheit
Medium-Well
145-155 degrees Fahrenheit
Well-Done
170 degrees Fahrenheit
Ground Beef
160 degrees Fahrenheit

We hope you found this Passanante Pro Tip useful! Have an idea that you’d like to see featured in a Pro Tip email? Send us a message on Facebook Page or email AmandaJane@HomeFoodServices.com.

Passanante Pro Tips: Cutlery 101

How To Pick The Right Knife For The Job

Without question, the knife is the most important tool in the kitchen and choosing the right knife for the job is an important step toward simplifying your cooking.

Using the correct knife helps give your food the appropriate texture, allows you to accomplish tasks more efficiently and can even reduce the risk of kitchen accidents.

Investing in a good-quality set of knives is a must for aspiring chefs and newlyweds alike, so do yourself a favor and swap those IKEA knives for something a little more reliable. Oh, and don’t forget to keep those blades nice and sharp!

A large all-purpose knife with a blade between 8-14 inches. Use daily for chopping, slicing, dicing and mincing.
A medium-sized all-purpose knife with a blade between 6-8 inches. Great for everyday tasks like cutting sandwiches.
 A short knife with a blade between 2-4 inches. Best for peeling, trimming and slicing small fruits and veggies.
A large knife with long, thin blade. Best for cutting cooked meat, poultry or even fish into neat, even slices.
A very sharp, thin knife with a blade between 5-7 inches.Perfect for removing meat and poultry from the bone.
Steak knives may have serrated or straight-edged blades. Best for cutting through heartier meats.
Also known as a serrated knife. Easily cuts through soft, fresh bread without squishing or ripping.
Tiny serrations on the blade make this knife ideal for cutting tomatoes and citrus neatly without squashing.

We hope you found this Passanante Pro Tip useful! Have an idea that you’d like to see featured in a Pro Tip email? Send us a message on Facebook Page or email AmandaJane@HomeFoodServices.com.